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I’m Pregnant, but am I Stressed?

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At a recent All in the Family Counselling parenting workshop, one moms asked “Did I do my child harm because I had a few ‘breakdowns’ while I was pregnant?”  “How do I know if I’m too stressed when I’m pregnant?” Yes, feeling stressed while pregnant is a common worry for women (ironic as it may seem).

 

It’s good to remember that certain amounts of stress are normal and not always bad for us.  Stress is part of the human condition and managing our stress in healthy ways will make us feel productive, happy and independent.

 

Women often place the unrealistic expectation upon themselves that being pregnant is supposed to be a time of bliss. Realistically, being pregnant can be a time of great change, discomfort, and uncertainty. Pregnant women also still have to deal with the usual daily challenges of relationships, family and work.

 

The term ‘stress’ is a word to describe hundreds of problems and conflicts we can experience.  Yet, stress can be a very personalized sensation, unique in its severity to each individual. The term ‘stress’ has become a catch-all word to describe anything that feels less than ideal.  So, how do you know when to seek help for stress?  Let’s take a look at the differences between what is meant by the terms stress, worry, and anxiety.

 

Stress

Stress is an event/situation/experiences, which creates mental and/or physical tension. A stressful situation has a wide range of possibilities.

 

a)    General annoyance (sore back, late to a doctor appointment, the cable goes out)

b)    Hardship and adversity (persistent health problems, not having enough money, or relationship issues)

c)    Traumatic event (threats of harm, victim of violence, loss, or crime). 

 

Tension from stress is usually experienced as a physical change in appetite, sleep, body temperature, and increased heart rate.  It is also experienced as an emotional change in making decisions, anger, fear, sadness, or helplessness.  However, the severity of these physical and emotional reactions depends on how an individual has learned to interpret and then cope with stressful situations. 

 

Worry

A stressful event will trigger worry. Worry is a series of persistent thoughts that process the information related to a stressful event.  Worry is a way that individuals may try to problem-solve to get rid of stress. Worry can become problematic if the thoughts can’t be turned off or when the thoughts feel out of control. 

 

Anxiety

This is an overall sense of a loss of control, general feelings of being threatened, or having a deep concern about the future.  What distinguishes anxiety from worry is that anxiety can also exist without a precipitating stressful event. Anxiety has very similar physical and emotional responses as stress but often results in limiting a person’s ability to function at home, work or in social situations.

 

Stress, worry and anxiety may become more prominent when pregnant, especially if the woman is predisposed to anxiety and worry. A professionally trained counselor can help give you skills to manage your anxiety and have a more relaxed and enjoyable pregnancy.

 

A professional trained marriage counsellor can also help you and spouse prepare for the changes that will be happening to your family after the arrival of your baby. Too many couples grossly underestimate how much a baby will change your relationship. It is important that a couple gets their relationship ready for their baby. We can also give you the tools you'll need to manage your stress and anxiety to make pregnancy more enjoyable Read more in our preparing for baby section.

 

All in the Family Counselling

22 Malacca Street, Level 9 Malacca Centre

MRT: Raffles Place

www.allinthefamilycounselling.com

9030 7239

Tammy M. Fontana, MS, NCC lead therapist

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